Day 325: Breakfast At Tiffany’s (1961)

audrey-hepburn-in-breakfast-at-tiffanysCan you believe that after today there are only five more Sundays left in the whole entire year of 2016. For today’s Sunday at the Classics, I wanted to choose a film that was so iconic, I am even surprised I never watched it. The film I am talking about is the world famous Breakfast At Tiffani’s which was released in 1961. Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn) is a New York socialite who just love to be wild and free and able to do whatever she wants. She quickly becomes interested in a writer name Paul Varjak (The A-Team’s George Peppard) who has just moved into her building. Quickly the two become friends and get very close, but Paul will soon begin to discover that Holly is a little more complicated than he expected. The film also stars Martin Balsam (Tora! Tora! Tora!) as O.J. Berman, Alan Reed (Lady And The Tramp) as Sally Tomato, Mickey Rooney (The Fox And The Hound) as Mr. Yunioshi, José Luis de Vilallonga (Juliet Of The Spirits) as José da Silva Pereira, Stanley Adams (Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex* But Were Afraid To Ask) as Rusty Trawler, Buddy Ebsen (The Beverly Hillbillies) as Doc Golightly, and the film was directed by Blake Edwards (Revenge Of The Pink Panther).

another-iconic-breakfast-tiffanyAt first I was trying hard to figure out what exactly the film was about because it just seemed that it was about a girl who was pretending to be something she’s not because she’s running away from her past. At times, you feel that Audrey Hepburns character has no idea exactly who she is, but she is kind of a snob or a gold digger. Throughout the whole film, she won’t commit to Paul because he’s not rich and she constantly called him by another name. That is until she is confronted finally by Paul that she comes to her senses because she finally figures out where she belongs. The thing I loved about this film are the cool romantic moments of the film like when they are challenging each other to do things that they had never done before. The thing that I didn’t like was how xenophobic Hollywood was back in 1961 in a time where Caucasian men played Native Americans and Asians. I don’t blame Mickey Rooney for taking the role, but Hollywood was notorious for that. They made Mr. Yunioshi a bumbling idiot and it is kind of offensive, but that is where the comedy is in the film. Nevertheless, this is an iconic film that I think everyone should check out. One of my favorite moments in the film as well was the scene where Paul hear’s Holly playing a song on her window sill. That is definitely a cool moment for the film that I will always remember from the beautiful Audrey Hepburn. I am going to give the film an A for a final grade because it was amazing and it’s a Hollywood classic.

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